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Durango, Colorado
Daniel Galloway

Born: Unknown
Died: 3 Feb 1882 in Animas City, CO

Daniel was a Civil War veteran, probably in the Ohio infantry. He was listed in the 1883 and 1887 Memorial Day Rolls of Honor in the Durango newspapers. Daniel, a miner, moved to Rico in 1880, but suffered from altitude problems. He often traveled to Durango and Animas City to improve his health, but after a lengthy illness, he died of consumption in Animas City. He was the son of Joseph Galloway of Ohio and the cousin of James Galloway of Antelope Park. His grave is not marked

Sarah Galloway

Born: 9 Jan 1881 in Colorado
Died: 18 May 1882

Sarah was the daughter of James N. and Amelia Galloway. It is unlikely that she was related to Daniel Galloway. Relative descendants of Sarah still reside in the Durango area. Sarah's grandmother, Sarah Jane Miller, is also buried in the cemetery.

Her gravestone is lying on the ground in pieces, but her epitaph is still legible:"Budded on earth to bloom in heaven."
Edith Garbanati

Born: Apr 1876 in Wyoming Territory
Died: 25 Jul 1895 in La Plata County, CO

Edith was the daughter of Judge Henry and Mary Garbanati. Although her grave is unmarked, her father's obituary states that she is buried alongside her parents.
Henry Garbanati

Born: 23 Sep 1820 in London, England
Died: 15 Dec 1910 in Durango, Colorado
 
The husband of Mary and the father of Edith, Henry was a prominent judge. From his obituary: He was a man who untied sound sense with strong convictions and a candid, outspoken temper, eminently fitted to mould the rude elements of pioneer society in which many years of his life was cast, into form and consistency, and aid in raising a high standard of citizenship in the young and growing state with whose lot he cast his fortunes. How much this community owes him, indeed how much the state owes him, it is impossible to estimate...Suffice it to say that he lived nobly and died peacefully at the advance age of 91 (sic) years.
Mary (Rowley) Garbanati

Born: 17 Aug 1853 in England
Died: 21 Mar 1892 in Durango, CO

Mary was the wife of Henry and the mother of Edith. She is the only Garbanati family member to have a headstone in the Animas City Cemetery.
Mary C. Goodrich

Born: 14 Feb 1831 in New York       
Died: 28 Feb 1886 in Durango, CO
 
Mary was the wife of Sylvester Goodrich. She died after suffering for more than a year from an injured left arm. Mary and Sylvester had a daughter, Mary. There is no headstone marking her grave.
Fredericka Hafling

Born: 17 Feb 1842 in Hamburg, Germany
Died: 27 Dec 1890 in the Animas Valley, CO

Fredericka was the first wife of George W. Hafling and the mother of Inez, Sylvia, Charles, George, Reuben and Rosa Belle. In 1887, George tried to convince a jury that Fredericka was 'crazy' and should be sent to the assylum. The jury found her not insane, and the judge assessed the costs on the plaintiff. The Durango Morning Herald reported that, "The parties returned home yesterday, apparently in good spirits." However it might have appeared, Fredericka was obviously not very happy as she filed for divorce and sued for alimony just two days later. The divorce was granted in February of 1888 after the court found that Fredericka's allegations of extreme cruelty by George against her were supported by the evidence. She was awarded alimony and child support and given custody of the children. Less than two years later, Fredericka passed away and was buried in the Animas City Cemetery. 
George Wilson Hafling

Born: 4 May 1841 in Contone, Switzerland     
Died: 16 Jan 1906 in Durango, CO

George was born in Contone, Switzerland and immigrated to the U.S. in 1854. He served in Co. E, 126 NY Infantry during the Civil War. He was injured in the Battle of Gettysburg and taken as a Prisoner of War at Harper’s Ferry. He was promoted to the esteemed position of Bugler. Over 57% of his regiment lost their lives in the War. 

When George arrived in America, he first settled in New York. After the War, he lived for awhile in Michigan, finally settling in Colorado. While living in the Animas Valley, George was a successful farmer. His property was where Haflin Creek is located. Though misspelled, Haflin Creek was probably named after his homesteaded property. George was naturalized as a United States citizen in La Plata County in 1881.


George unsuccessfully attempted to have his first wife Frederika declared incurably insane in December 1887. He may have been an abusive husband as a few months later the judge granted Frederika’s request for a divorce citing extreme cruelty. Fredericka died while in the care of her daughter in 1890.

On Christmas day in 1891, George married the widow Teanie Barrie. They each had some children from previous marriages and then had two children together. After Teanie died (see Teanie Barrie Hafling in th Barrie family section), George published a notice in the newspaper requesting a release of guardianship of Teanie’s two daughters (from her first marriage to James Barrie). A short time later, the Barrie girls were recorded in censuses living elsewhere as servants. 

George married his third wife, Amelia Steinbrecher, in 1898. Together they had a daughter named Louisa and possibly one other child. After their marriage, they spent a lot of time in Missouri. While at his son's home in Durango in 1906, George died of complications of diabetes. His widow Amelia lived in Missouri after his death. 

In spite of his shortcomings, George was described in his obituary as being a sturdy, prominent and progressive farmer and rancher. He was respected as a good citizen who did his part in the ‘upbuilding’ of the county well.

His burial ceremony was conducted under the auspices of the local G.A.R. chapter. George was laid rest in the Hafling family plot, at the opposite end of his first wife Fredericka.
Louisa C. Hafling

Born: 24 Jun 1899 in Durango, CO  
Died: 10 May 1900 in La Plata County, CO

Louisa was the daughter of George W. Hafling and Amelia Steinbrecher (surname from a first marriage) Hafling. She is buried in the Hafling family plot.
Rosa Belle Hafling

Born: 30 Mar 1881 in La Plata Co., CO  
 Died: 11 Jul 1883 in La Plata Co., CO

Only a small footstone resting on its side marks the grave of two year old Rosa Belle Hafling. She was the daughter of George and Fredericka Hafling.  
Sylvia Luella Hafling

Born: 16 Jun 1872 in Kansas  
Died: 17 Oct 1889 in La Plata Co., CO

Sylvia was the daughter of George and Fredericka Hafling. She died from the measles. Although her headstone records her name as Silvia, all other records have her name spelled Sylvia. She rests beside her mother in the Hafling family plot.
Hafling Family Plot

Left to right: George W. Hafling (Civil War headstone), Louisa Hafling, (Space), RBH footstone, Sylvia Hafling, Fredericka Hafling. 

Note the space between Louisa's headstone and the RBH footstone. George and Fredericka had a son, George E., who died and may be buried in the cemetery. Nothing conclusive is known about his death at this time, but it is possible that he is buried in this space. Another possibility, though perhaps less likely, is that George's second wife Teanie (Harpham) Barrie Hafling is buried in this space. 
Belle Fulcher Hampton

Born: 16 Jan 1881 in Colorado  
Died: 2 Nov 1906 in her home on the Pine River, CO

Note: Although Belle's obituary states that she was buried in the Animas City Cemetery next to her father John Fulcher, there is a headstone for Belle in the Florida "Hood" Cemetery.

Belle was the daughter of John Fulcher and Lucinda Fulcher Nichols. She married John Hampton in Durango on 25 Jul 1906. Just four short months later, Belle got a severe throat infection, culminating in blood poisoning. Her widower moved to the Montrose area and never remarried. There is a headstone for both of them in the Florida "Hood" Cemetery, which was originally owned by John Hampton's father.
Harold Hartman

Born: 19 Dec 1883 in Colorado  
Died: 5 Sep 1884 in La Plata Co., CO

Little Harold Hartman was the son of "The Idea" newspaper editor, Frank Hartman and his wife Nettie. From the 6 Sep 1884 edition, page 1:

In Memoriam - Sorrow and death are at any moment liable to overtake any of us. None are exempt. The cup of bitterness is always running over; sooner or later we all will have to partake thereof. This newspaper is in mourning to-day. Its editor has no heart to dip his pen in ink. The most poignant grief known to the human heart has overtaken Frank and Nettie Hartman. Their bright little baby boy Harold, a sunbeam that was welcomed into their home eight months and a half ago, disppeared from the happy household, on Friday morning, at two o'clock. He was too bright and delicate a flower for this world. So the angel of death claimed him and carried him swiftly and silently away to a land where there are no more tears, pains, sorrows and temptations, a land where he will be tenderly cared for, and where there is unspeakable love and sympathy for those who are left behind in the shadow of their great gloom. He was  a beautiful boy, with a magnificent head and the sweetest disposition, and words are feeble things when one undertakes to describe the anguish of the father and mother and other kindred, or express the profound sympathy the writer feels for them. God bless, comfort, and help them.

There is no headstone marking Harold's grave
Cellas Hawkins

Born: abt 1856 in Alabama  
Died: 21 Dec 1883 in La Plata Co., CO

Cellas Hawkins, described by a local newspaper as a good man, died after a bank robbery gone awry. On December 16, 1883, Hawkins, a black man who worked in Philpot's Saloon, and a gang of a four other white men decided to carry out their scheme to rob the First National Bank of Durango. According to plan,  Cellas began chiseling into the bank vault at about 11:00 p.m. on that fateful night. However, there being no honor among thieves, the other gang members didn't ignite the four fires they had said they would use to distract the townspeople and they never showed up to help him pull off the heist. It was speculated that they caught wind that the authorities were onto them, so they steered clear of the bank that evening, chose not to warn Cellas, and let him take the fall. 

After learning of the impending robbery from the bank janitor (a former friend of Hawkins'), bank employee Alfred Camp, town Marshall O'Connor, Sheriff Barney Watson, and several others staked out the bank from across the street and other locations near the building. Hoping to catch the entire gang committing the crime, they patiently waited about forty minutes after Hawkins began the tedious job of chipping into the mortar of the vault. When Hawkins shifted his light and darkness filled the bank, Marshall O'Connor gave the signal to surround the building and made his move to apprehend the burglar. Kicking in the door, the Marshall rushed in on Hawkins, who commenced firing his revolver.

In an unfortunate twist of fate, R. Bruce Hunt, a young bank security guard who had not been included in planning the sting operation, but found out about the burglary scheme and decided to lend a hand, walked into the escalating situation. One of Hawkins' bullets ripped its way through Hunt's collar bone, pierced his lung and exited through his back. Hunt died a short time later in the drug store across the street. Bruce Hunt was the son of Colorado's ex-Governor A.C. Hunt.

In the ensuing commotion, Hawkins was able to flee on horseback. He made his way onto the Ute Reservation and camped out in the Ignacio and Arboles area for a couple of days. The outraged townspeople collected $500 to offer as a reward to anybody who would bring Hawkins in, dead or alive. A short time later, a small posse found Hawkins' camp and surrounded him. When Hawkins realized that he was trapped, he bolted off of a small cliff in an attempt to end his life.  His desperate maneuver failed. Landing on the jagged rocks below, Cellas broke his back, but did not die. The posse retrieved the severely injured Hawkins, and then cruelly left him writhing in agony while they returned to town to negotiate for the reward money. The financial arrangements made, the men returned to take the broken Hawkins to the town jail where he was attended by a physician and counseled by his former boss, Robert S. Philpot. 

With encouragement from Philpot, and nothing to be gained or lost, Hawkins gave a full sworn statement, confessing his own involvement and implicating the four other men. Hawkins died shortly after his confession and his body was taken to the Folsom morgue. It is not specifically stated that he was buried in the Animas City Cemetery, but as the Folsoms owned the cemetery and Cellas was a town resident, it is almost certain that he is buried there. If so, he is the only known black person buried in the cemetery.

* * * Coda * * *

Hawkins' sworn statement was deemed inadmissible in court and the four men who devised the bank robbery got off the hook. Sadly, Hawkins' widow Rebecca was left destitute. With no other options, she made the heart wrenching decision to indenture her young son Samuel to R.S. Philpot and his new wife, Elizabeth. In a recorded document, Rebecca gave seven-year-old son Samuel to the Philpots to be their servant in exchange for them feeding him, providing him with a minimal education, and keeping him in good health until the age of 18 years. Whether or not the Philpots fulfilled this obligation and what became of Rebecca remains a mystery. If there is a bright note in all of this, it is that several years later Samuel emerged in Oklahoma as a miner, then married a woman with whom he raised a family. His descendents reside in Michigan.
Martin L. Heck

Born: abt 1847 in Indiana
Died: 3 Apr 1886 in La Plata Co., CO

Martin was a constable who was killed in a shootout with a gambler. He was the husband of Mary A. Heck. He was a Union soldier in the Civil War in 149th Indiana Infantry, Co. K.
Edmund M. Hopson

Born: abt 1837 in New York
Died: 18 Nov 1880 in La Plata Co., CO

Before heading west to Durango to prospect with a company of ten men, Dr. Edmund Hopson owned an apothecary in New Jersey while residing in New York. He was the first doctor sent for to attend to Chief Ouray a few days before Ouray died. Dr. Hopson was honored with the first tombstone erected in cemetery (apparently not the one that currently marks his grave, but a marble one that is no longer present in the cemetery). It was provided by his comrade Mr. Isaac Pye in June 1881. It is noted in the article regarding the erection of this tombstone that there were already more than 50 unmarked graves in the Animas City Cemetery before 1881.
Richard Hudson

Born: Unknown
Died: 30 Sep 1886, La Plata Co., CO

Although his obituary states that he was buried in the Animas City Cemetery, there is a headstone for him in Greenmount Cemetery. 
Charles Hull

Born: abt 1843 in Louisiana      
Died: 31 May 1881 in La Plata Co., CO

Although there is no headstone marking his grave, it is believed that he is buried in the Animas City Cemetery because of the date and location of his death.
Infant Boy Ireland

Born: Unknown, La Plata Co., CO
Died: 19 Feb 1905 in La Plata Co., CO

He was the son of David and Margaret Ireland. Although he has no headstone, his obituary states that he was interred in the Animas City Cemetery.
Chester B. Jackson

Born: abt 1843 in Michigan      
Died: 9 May 1881

Chester B. Jackson served in the Illinois 106th Volunteer Infantry. He was mentioned in the 1883 and 1887 Memorial Day Rolls of Honor and was referenced as being buried in the Animas City Cemetery. It is interesting to note that he has a Civil War headstone in Greenmount Cemetery. It is unknown if he was disinterred from the Animas City Cemetery and reinterred at Greenmount, or if just the Civil War headstone was installed at Greenmount Cemetery when it was ordered by the G.A.R. in 1896.  There is no marker for him now at the Animas City Cemetery.
Mary Ellen (Uaunt) Jimerfield 

Born:  27 Mar 1883 in Kansas
Died: 1942 

Mary was the wife of Thomas G. Jimerfield. 
Click on thumbnail for larger view.
Thomas Jimerfield 

Born: 21 Sep 1863
Died: 3 May 1928 in La Plata County, CO

Thomas was the husband of Mary and the father of 
Sadie, Alma, Nelson, Alex, Thomas and Frank. 
He died from heart trouble and asthma.
Alfred J. Jones

Born: abt 1859
Died: 20 Nov 1883 in Durango, CO

From a memoriam as published in "The Southwest" on 24 Nov 1883, pg 1:
"Mr. Alfred Jones, who was so badly injured by a land slide on the 15th of October, died at the Mercy Hospital, Durango, on the 20th at 8:30 a.m. He was a man of upright principles and Christian sentiments, and bore his painful and trying illness with admirable patience. His last words were grateful thanks to the Sisters for their untiring care of him."

From his obituary it is known that Alfred was about 24 years old and formerly from near Calhoun, Mississippi. The only known relation known to be living at the time of his death was a brother from whom he had had no word since his accident. Supposedly a cousin was on his way to see Alfred in the hospital, but did not arrive in time. There is no headstone. Although it is not absolutely certain that Alfred is buried in the Animas City Cemetery, it is quite likely.
Charles A. Jones

Born: abt 1859
Died: 2 Mar 1881 in Animas City, CO

Charles died as a result of a cold he got after his boat capsized in the Animas River. He was described as a man of good character and industrious. His obituary states that he had a brother, Clayborn Jones who also lived in the San Juan country. They were from Buchanan County, MO, where their father, a minister of the Gospel, still resided at the time of his death. There is no headstone. Although it is not absolutely certain that Charles is buried in the Animas City Cemetery, it is quite likely because of where he resided and his date of death.
Matilda Keegan

Born: 15 Jan 1882, Durango, CO
Died: 16 Jul 1882 in Durango, CO

Matilda was the daughter of Peter J. and Grace (Clough) Keegan. Peter was a prominent Durango citizen and railroad man. There is no headstone for Matilda. Although it is not absolutely certain that Matilda is buried in the Animas City Cemetery, it is quite likely because of her death date and the family's residence at the time of her death.
James H. Knapp

Born: Unknown
Died: 12 Jul 1886 in Durango, CO

James drowned after he attempted to ford the Animas River with his wagon. The wagon overturned and somehow disable him, making him unable to swim to  shore. It was speculated that he suffered a blow to the head. He was interred in the Animas Cemetery until word was received from his family back east as to what to do with his remains. It is unknown if he still rests in the Animas City Cemetery. There is no headstone for James.
Fred Kolz, Jr.

Born: Unknown
Died: 1890

This information came from Henry Ninde. I believe it's possible that this could be Henry Kolz who died in 1887. There is no headstone for any Kolz in the Animas City Cemetery.
Candacy (Mercer) Lambert

Born: 1820 in Kentucky
Died: 4 Jan 1891, Animas Valley, CO

It is not confirmeed than Candacy is buried in the Animas City Cemetery, but as she died in Animas Valley and it is known that her two sons are buried in the cemetery, it is quite likely that  whe was interred here. Candacy was the wife of Hugh Lambert and the mother of William Henry and Riley. In "Pioneers of the San Jan Country" it is said that Candacy was the first white woman to settle in the Animas Valley.
Riley Lambert

Born: 16 Nov 1852 in Iowa
Died: 28 Nov 1883 in Silverton, CO

Son of Hugh and Candacy Lambert; brother of William Henry. Riley was shot by Silverton Marshal Tom Cain in Silverton after a long standing feud. Riley and his family were early pioneers, settling in the Animas Valley in 1876.
This page was last updated: December 4, 2012
William Henry Lambert

Born: 1849 in Missouri
Died: 17 Oct 1889 in La Plata County, CO

Son of Hugh and Candacy Lambert; brother of Riley. He was supposedly shot in back by Sheriff Bud Sargent. There is no grave marker for William.
Robert Laney

Born: abt 1841
Died: 23 Jan 1881 in Durango, CO

Although his burial in the cemetery is not confirmed, because of the date and location of his death, he is probably interred in the Animas City Cemetery. His was the first death that occurred in Durango due to natural causes - pneumonia. Very little was known of him. He had no papers on him. He was a teamster who worked for Myers & West’s Livery. He was known as a sober and industrious man. 
Ellen (Rhoades) Lavender

Born: Sep or Oct 1836 in Missouri
Died: 5 Feb 1884 in La Plata County, CO

Ellen was a resident of La Plata County since 1878. She was related to the Culvers and Gaines families through her daughter’s marriage to George Culver.

Ellen is buried beside her two sons, Henry and Orvil, who preceded her in death. They share one headstone with each person's information carved onto one side of the stone. There is a footstone for each person in a straight row on the east side of the headstone.
Henry G. Lavender

Born: 29 Nov 1875
Died: 1 May 1878 in La Plata County, CO

Henry was the son of Henry William and Ellen Lavender. He has the earliest death date recorded on a headstone in the cemetery. It is very likely that this headstone was installed after his brother (or his brother and mother) passed away. (See note about the headstone in Ellen Lavender's information.)
Orvil Lavender

Born: 1877
Died: 16 Aug 1880 in La Plata County, CO

Orvil died when he was two years old. He was the son of Henry William and Ellen Lavender. (See note about the headstone in Ellen Lavender's information
Infant Son Lawrence

Born: abt 14 Jun 1882
Died: 19 Jul 1882 in Durango, CO

Although his burial in the cemetery is not confirmed, because of the date and location of his death, he is probably interred in the Animas City Cemetery. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. F.C. Lawrence.
Henry and Ellen (Rhoades) Lavender

Photo courtesy of Bob and Lynn Spohr
John McCormick

Born: abt 1833
Died: 29 Oct 1884 in Durango, CO

Civil War veteran, 6th Wisconsin Infantry & 10th U.S. Infantry.  His burial in the Animas City Cemetery was mentioned in a Memorial Day story in 1885. There is a Civil War headstone as well as an inscription for him on a shared headstone with a Catharine McCormick in Greenmount in a McCormick family plot. It is believed that they were husband and wife and the father of Bernard McCormick. It is unknown if he was disinterred from Animas City Cemetery and reinterred in Greenmount or if his Civil War headstone was installed as a cenotaph in Greenmount. As his wife also died before Greenmount was a cemetery, it is possible that she was also once buried, or remains buried, in the Animas City Cemetery.
Calvin L. McGrew

Born: 20 Oct 1825 in Kentucky
Died: 4 Nov 1893 in the Animas Valley

Calvin was married to Martha L (Ward) and was a rancher. He was a respected citizen and a pioneer of La Plata County, having settled in the area in about 1880. He died of Bright's Disease and left his widow, a young daughter and two sons to mourn their loss. 
Click thumbnail for larger view of inscription
A.B. McLean

Born: 1903 in Durango, CO
Died: 14 Aug 1904 in Durango, CO

A. B. was probably the child of Charles and Bessie (Ward) McLean. There is no grave marker for this child, but his or her burial in the Animas City Cemetery is recorded in the Hood Mortuary compiled records.
Leland F. McLean

Born: May 1911 in Durango, CO
Died: 4 Jun 1911 in Durango, CO

Leland was probably the son of Charles and Bessie (Ward) McLean. There is no grave marker for this child, but his burial in the Animas City Cemetery is recorded in the Hood Mortuary compiled records.
Infant Daughter McLean

Born: Unknown
Died: 4 Nov 1903 in Durango, CO

She was the daughter of Charles and Bessie (Ward) McLean. She died of scarlet fever. There is no grave marker for this child.
Emily Meuser

Born: 25 Apr 1868
Died: 10 Oct 1883 in Durango, CO

She was the oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Meuser and was described as a lovely Christian girl. She died of typhoid fever and left her parents, brothers and sisters to mourn their loss. There is no grave marker for this young woman. Although it is not absolutely certain that Emily is buried in the Animas City Cemetery, it is quite possible because of where she resided at the time of her death and the date of her death.
E. Miller

Born: Unknown
Died: Unknown

According to research provided by Henry Ninde, E. Miller was a Civil War veteran. Nothing else is known about him. This burial is uncertain and there is no headstone marking his grave.
John Miller

Born: 24 June 1833 in Denmark
Died: 7 Oct 1889 in La Plata County, CO

John was a single man and was not likely related to any other Millers buried in the Animas City Cemetery.
Mary E. Miller

Born: 10 Oct 1857
Died: 9 Apr 1887 in La Plata County, CO

Mary died of consumption.  According to her obituary, Mary moved to Durango too late to recover from the disease, and she left behind a husband and four children. Her gravestone says that she was the wife of Lawrence Miller. A former cemetery researcher claims Mary's daughter, Mary F. Miller is also buried in the cemetery, but there is no supporting evidence of this.
Sarah Jane (Linn) Miller

Born: abt 1817
Died: 16 Mar 1893 in La Plata County, CO

Sarah Jane Miller was the mother of Mrs. J.N. Galloway and the grandmother of Sarah Galloway who is also buried in the Animas City Cemetery. The cause of her death was a deep cold she contracted at an advanced age. There is no headstone marking her grave, but her obituary states that she is buried in this cemetery.
Walter Moore

Born: May 1884 in Colorado
Died: 29 Mar 1887 in La Plata County, CO

Walter was the son of Alexander and Julius (Kincaid) Moore. He died of scarlet fever. There is no headstone marking his grave.
Henry Read Moorman

Born: Unknown
Died: 11 Apr 1881 in La Plata County, CO

Henry Read Moorman, a gambler, was lynched by a group of men the day after shooting James Knox Polk Prindle in cold blood at the Coliseum, a notorious amusement place. This was the first lynching to occur in Durango proper. A pine tree in front of the post office was used for the hanging.
Albert K. Nail

Born: 1861
Died: 18 Aug 1891 in La Plata County, CO

Albert was a member of the Woodmen of the World. His Woodmen grave marker is lying flat on the ground.
Andrew A. Nichols

Born: 2 Apr 1902 in Colorado
Died: 8 Nov 1920 in Telluride, CO

Andrew was the  son of Andrew Nichols, Sr., the grandson of Nancy Jane (King) Nichols Casey and the brother of Agnes and William Nichols and half-first cousin to Myrtle Casey, all of whom are buried in this cemetery. Andrew's death occurred after he was pulled into a machine in a mining operation at the Smuggler Union Mine in Telluride.
Agnes M. Nichols

Born: 14 Oct 1897 in Colorado
Died: 26 Nov 1905 in La Plata County, CO

Agnes was the daughter of Andrew Nichols, Sr., the granddaughter of Nancy Jane (King) Casey, the sister of Andrew A. and William Nichols and the half-first cousin to Myrtle Casey, all of whom are buried in the cemetery. Agnes reportedly died from diphtheria.
William Ellis Nichols

Born: 7 Feb 1909 in USA
Died: 6 Jan 1913 in La Plata County, CO

William was the son of Andrew Nichols, Sr., the grandson of Nancy Jane (King) Casey), the brother of Andrew A. and William Nichols and the half-first cousin to Myrtle Casey, all of whom are buried in the cemetery.


The Nichols and Caseys are all buried in what was known as the Casey family plot. Some of the graves are unmarked.  Hugh "Jacob" Casey's Civil War headstone can be seen just behind and to the left of Agnes and William's headstone.
Samuel T. Nichols

Born: 13 Sep 1846 in Illinois
Died: 8 Sep 1906 in La Plata County, CO

He was the second husband of Lucinda Fulcher Nichols, who was first married to John Fulcher. Samuel was probably not related to the other Nichols buried in the cemetery. Sam was a rancher who died by suicide after becoming despondent about his incurable cancer. He is buried just outside the fenced plot belonging to John Fulcher.
Animas City Cemetery
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